Learning Experience 3: Early European Exploration and Colonization

NWT Grade 5 Social Studies Pilot

8 Class Periods (@ 50 minutes each)
images-1.jpg
Jacques Cartier (1491-1557)
https://os8thsoth.wikispaces.com/European+Exploration?f=print

Unit Description

This is the third learning experience as part of a pilot for the Nortwest Territories' new grade 5 Social Studies curriculum. It is an inquiry-based learning experience, that requires students to use acknowledge their personal strengths to pursue an inquiry-based project that will answer one of the essential questions:
  • What were the reasons European nations had for choosing to risk sailing across unmapped oceans before the 17th century and which European nation was the most successful in achieving its goals?
  • Who was the best explorer to come from Europe to Canada?
In addition to the inquiry-based project, students will participate in daily mini-lesson activities to explore the estabilished goals.
A UDL approach in this unit provides the following:
  • flexible goals
  • presentational options (using SmartBoard technology and visuals) to make information accessible to all students
  • access to technology that will assist in making information accessible to all students
  • Inquiry project selections based upon multiple intelligences
  • motivational options to ensure that all students can be engaged
  • flexible classroom management techniques that increase opportunities for all students


Class Learning Profile

Grade: 5 Teacher: Mrs. C
Subject: NWT Social Studies
Standard: Early European Exploration and Colonization
NWT Unit Goals:
  • KG-043 Identify European countries that established colonial empires and locate on a world map their areas of colonization
  • KP-047 Identify reasons why the Europeans wanted to expand their territories to include North America
  • KH-025 Relate stories of European explores and traders in search for new lands in North America or the Northwest Passage.

Network

StudentsStrengths
StudentsNeeds
StudentsPreferences/Interests

Recognition

(Learning “what”)

· Extensive musical background
· Skilled with rhymes, poetry, language play.
· Limited vocabulary
· Difficulty with reading:
word recognition
word decoding
text structures/story grammar
author style
fluency

· Tendency for literal interpretation
· Difficulty finding important information

Strategy
(Learning “how”)

· familiar with electronic encyclopedia and the web
· Very good at oral presentations
· Talented artist (painting)
· Talented artist (drawing)
· Talented singer
· Talented at constructing (building) materials.
· Outstanding at composing visual materials.


· Difficulty with organization when doing a project or paper
· Poor writing mechanics—spelling, proofreading, handwriting
· Difficulty with oral presentations
· Trouble finding key concepts
· Restless and figety
· Trouble completing work
· Poor self-monitoring
· Poor memory for spoken words
· Poo memory for written words

Affect
(Learning “why”)

· Highly confident
· High energy
· Good leadership skills
· Difficulty working in groups
· Withdrawn
· Problems outside of school
· Gives up easily
· Difficulty working independently
· Tendency to be disruptive/clown around.
· Loves art
· Enjoys working with the computer
· Prefers hands-on activities
· Loves to sing and create songs/raps
· Prefers structured tasks

Adapted from CAST (2009). UDL class learning profile templates. Retrieved November 22, 2009 from: http://www.cast.org/teachingeverystudent/tools/classprofiletemplate.cfm



Curricular Goals

KG-043 Identify European countries that established colonial empires and locate on a world map their areas of colonization. Include: Portugal, Spain, France, England, Holland.
JP-047 Identify reasons why the Europeans wanted to expand their territories to include North America. Examples: international competition, resources, religion, trade…
KH-025 Relate stories of European explorers and traders in their search for new lands in North America or the Northwest Passage. Examples: Leif Ericsson, Giovanni Caboto, Jacques Cartier, Martin Frobisher, Henry Hudson.

Essential Questions:

A: What were the reasons the European nations had for choosing to risk sailing across unmapped oceans before the 17th century, and which European nation was the most successful in achieving its goals?

B: Who was the best explorer to come from Europe to Canada?




Planning Pyramid:


All students will understand that
  • a number of European nations were actively exploring in different parts of the world before the 17th century.
  • European explorers had significant interacgtions with Aboriginal people they met in Canada
  • Aboriginals and Europeans had Different views about the land (sharing vs. owning)
All students will know…
  • Which European nations were actively exploring in different parts of the world before the 17th centrury.
  • That European explorers (and their nations) may have viewed ‘land’ differently than the Aboringinal people they encourntered.
All students will be able to…
  • Use research skills to inquire into a chosen Essential Question

Most Students will Understand that…
  • These European nations had various reasons for this exploration
  • Explorers had different goals and ways of going about their missions
  • European explorers had varying degrees of success in ther accomplishment of their missions.
Most students will know…
  • The reasons European nations had for this exploration
Most students will be able…
  • Use mapping skills to locate on a world map, European nations involved in exploration (includes legends, cardinal directions, scale)

Some students will know…

  • Various explorer names, the routes they took and the significant things they did on their voyages of exploration
Some students will be able…
  • To develop criteria in small group settings for what they consider to be the essential qualities of a “best explorer” or “most successful” exploring nation.
  • Describe how a European explorer or nation may view “land” .


Unit Overview

UDL features of this unit have been based upon CAST (2009) UDL Guidelines.

Curricular Goal of Mini-lesson
Learning Experiences
Resources
Notes

Pre-Lesson: Introduction to Multiple Intelligences

Anticipatory Set:
Slide Show: Show students a slide show with pictures demonstrating multiple intelligences (ex. Athletes, writers, musicians, artists…).
Discuss: What does “multiple intelligence” mean? (we are all good at different things)
Introduce/Model New Knowledge: Show the multiple intelligences worksheet on the SmartBoard. The title of each multiple intelligence can be clicked to show visual examples of that particular intelligence.
Guided Practice: no guided practice
Independent Practice: Distribute multiple intellience worksheets. Students also have the option of reviewing the SmartBoard file on their laptops. Students circle the intelligences that they feel are their strongest.
Wrap-up: Partner Share
Turn to the person beside you and share what you learned about multiple intelligences. What are you best at doing?
Assessment: Formative
-iMovie Presentation:
Multiple Intelligence iMovie
-Multiple Intelligence Worksheet -SmartBoard
-Kurtzweil 3000 or Read and Write Gold text-to-speech software.

KG-043
KP-047
KH-025
Lesson 1: Inquiry Project Selection
Activate Prior Knowledge:
Slide Show: Essential Question A: Show students a slide show with pictures of Early European explorers of North America.
Discuss: Possible inquiry projects (displayed as a list with links to multiple intelligences).
Video: Essential Question B: show students a short video that will activate interest in this essential question: Who was the best explorer to come from Europe to Canada?
Discuss: Possible inquiry projects (displayed as a list with links to multiple intelligences).
Wrap-up: Show students a copy of their Inquiry Choice forms. They are to take home for completion and parental signature of support. Due tomorrow.
-Slideshow
-Video
-Essential Question A: Inquiry Choices



-Essential Question B: Inquiry Choices



-Take-home inquiry choices:



-SmartBoard

-Personal Computers/Laptops
-internet access

KG-043
Lesson 2: European Countries and Explorers Involved in Early Exploration.
Activate Background Knoweldge (10minutes):
Share learning goals with the students. In this unit, we will be learning about the European countries and explorers that sailed to North American before the 17th century. Using inspiration software, projected onto the SmartBoard (or simply a blackboard and chalk), lead a class brainstorming session on the lesson’s topic: Ask students to tell you everything they know about early European explorers and the reasons why they sailed to North America. After 5-6 minute brainstorming session, engage students in a class discussion to organize and categorize the different ideas raised.

KWL Chart (10 minutes): Ask students to return to their work areas to develop a personal KWL chart.

Wrap-up (5 minutes) Ask students to share their questions (what they wonder) with the class. Record these as a large chart.

Assessment: Formative
Inquiry Project (30 minutes)
The remainder of the class is dedicated to students exploring their inquiry projects. There is a folder prepared for each of the 8 Inquiry Questions. Each folder will be accessible online and will contain the following:
- List of possible reference materials
- Project monitoring chart
- Project Template
- Graphic organizers
-Audio recorders to keep track of optional verbal 'notes'.

Assessment: Formative (Observations)
-Smartboard
-Inspiration software
-KWL Chart
-Personal Computers/Laptops
-Access to internet
-Review Assessment Evidence:



-Audacity (voice recorder)

-Graphic organizers from Read and Write Gold.

-Inquiry Project Guides:

Student Reference Materials for
Essential Question A:



Student Reference Materials for Essential Question B:



Inquiry Project Monitoring Chart:


Inquiry Project Template:



-Graphic Organizers
Inspiration
ReadWriteThink Webbing Tool
Learn Alberta: Graphic Organizer Templates

KG-043
KP-047
Lesson 3: Which European Nations were actively exploring North America?

Activate Prior Knowledge (10 minutes)
Discuss: What were the major European colonizing countries? Today we will learn what countries were interested in colonizing in North America and think about the reasons why they wanted to explore North American lands.
Map (minutes): using an interactive world map from SmartBoard Notebook 10, students locate the major European colonizing countries (Portugal, Spain, France, England, and Netherlands).

Think-Pair-Share (10 minutes): Why do you think people from Europe would have wanted to explore Canada? Small groups Brainstorm reasons why people in these countries would have wanted to come to North America. Share answers with the class.

Assessment: Formative

Inquiry Project (30 minutes)
Students continue to work on their independent inquiry projects.

Teacher will go to each group to give feedback and go over project monitoring chart. Teacher will also work with groups to develop a rubric for assessment.

Assessment: Formative/Observational
-SmartBoard with Notebook 10 software.

- Rubric for Learning Experience



-Inquiry project reference materials

KG-047
KH-025
Lesson 4: How did Europeans perceive the world prior to the 15th century?

Activate Prior Knowledge (10 minutes)
Picture what the world would have been like in the 15th century. How was it different? How was it the same?
Today we are going to look at the early ocean-going ships and think about what the world must have been like for the early European explorers of the 15th century. We will also think about why they wanted to explore the Atlantic Ocean and what they needed in order to do their explorations.
Digital Images: Students view digital images of early ocean-going ships.
Discuss: How are these ships different from those of today? Start to think about what important items the explorers would have needed to have.

Group Research(20 minutes) Groups of students choose a country to depart (Portugal, Spain, France, England, or Netherlands). Using a world map, students outline and describe an exploratory voyage. They may use pictures, words, or audio recordings to display their work.

Assessment: Marking Rubric created on Rubistar (http://rubistar.4teachers.org) (5%)

Inquiry Project (20 minutes)
Students continue to work on their independent inquiry projects.

Teacher will go to each group to give feedback and go over project monitoring chart.
-Various digital Images of early Ocean-going ships

-SmartBoard

-Digital and print World maps

-laptops

-Audacity (voice recorder)

- Rubistar (http://rubistar.4teachers.org)

KP-047
Lesson 5: Poster Profiles of Early European Exploration.

Activate Prior Knowledge (10 minutes)

Slideshow: Students view a slide show with various digital images depicting some of the reasons European countries wanted to explore North America.
Discuss: What are some of the reasons European countries wanted to explore North America?
Develop a list with students to include:
-European social conditions
-Sailing ships and navigation
-European expansion
-Trade in Europe and Asia
-Colonies and colonization
-Religion and missionaries
-Health and disease
-Search for the Northwest Passage
Jigsaw Activity (30 minutes): small groups of students choose a topic to become an 'expert' (each topic should be chosen and reviewed). Develop marking criteria rubric as a class and set expectations.
Students use the internet and printed reference materials to gather information about their topic. Students then create posters profiling highlights of early European exploration.

Assessment: Marking Rubric created on Rubistar (http://rubistar.4teachers.org) (5%)

Inquiry Project (10 minutes): Groups meet and go over their project monitoring chart, making sure that they are following the correct time line and group members are doing their part.
-Slide show with various digital images depicting life early European countries; include social conditions, sailing ships, trade in Asia, disease, missionaries, Northwest Passage.

-Laptops/Personal Computers

-Access to internet

-Audacity (voice recorder)

-Rubistar (http://rubistar.4teachers.org)

-Inquiry project materials



KH-025
Lesson 6: Northwest Passage Music Response

Activate Prior Knoweldge (15 minutes)
Video:
Search for the Northwest Passage (Part 1) Discuss: Where is the Northwest Passage?
Why are Europeans interested in discovering this route. We are going to listen to a famous song by Stan Rogers called "The Northwest Passage" to find out why the Europeans were interested in discovering this route.
Audio (Music) (10 minutes): Students listen to "The Northwest Passage" by Stan Rogers and record the names of places and people mentioned in the song. Students listen to the song individually on laptops and use Inspiration software to type the names of people and places in the song. They may listen to the song multiple times (until time runs out).
Discuss (5 minutes): the meaning of the term "Northwest Passage" and why Europeans were interested in discovering this route.

Inquiry Project (20 minutes)
Students continue to work on their Inquiry Project.
The teacher facilitates learning by meeting with each group and checking in with their project monitoring chart and template. Teacher guides students to maximally utilize the reference materials.
Video: Search for the Northwest Passage (Part 1)

-"The Northwest Passage" by Stan Rogers.

-Inspiration Software

-Laptops/Personal Computers

-Inquiry project reference materials

KH-025
Lesson 7: Judging the Best Explorer

Activate Prior Knowledge (5 minutes)
Discuss: In your opinion, who is the best athlete in North America? When you compare this athlete to others, how do you know they are better? What reasons can you think of?
Today we are going to compare four early European explorers are judge who the best explorer was.
Judging the Best(15 minutes): as a class, develop criteria or qualities that make for the "best" explorer. Record this criteria in the MSWord template. Students have access to this on computers, or can choose to use a hard copy to write on. Student then use the criteria to make a decision as to who the "best" explorer was.
Wrap-up (5 minutes)
Discuss: From your criteria, who was the "best" explorer?
If we changed the criteria, do you think you would have a different result?

Inquiry Project (25 minutes)
Students continue to work on their Inquiry Project.
The teacher facilitates learning by meeting with each group and checking in with their project monitoring chart and template. Teacher guides students to maximally utilize the reference materials.
-Judging the Best Worksheet



-laptops

-SmartBoard (to model use of template)

-Inquiry project reference materials



KH-025
Lesson 8: Is Taking Prisoners OK?

Activate Prior Knowledge (10 minutes):
Were laws the same in the past as they are today? Did people treat each other the way are expected to today?
In the past people handled things in different ways. Laws were not the same and people did not always treat each other with the respect that we expect today. To really understand a people and events from history it is important to take a historical perspective. This means that we try to imagine how this person thinks and feels. We try to picture what was 'normal' during a particular time in history and we don't use our beliefs of what is right and wrong nowadays to judge people from the past.

Video (11 minutes): Students view Episode 1: An Air of savage Magnificency (5 min) and Captivity (6 min) - The massacre of the crew of the ship Boston and John Jewitt's capture from Maquinna

Monologue (20 minutes): students pretend to be "one of the sides" in the conflict and prepare a short monologue (speech) that explains and defends their perspective in the conflict. Students may choose to write their speech or prepare a verbal presentation. Develop marking criteria and create a rubric on Rubistar.

Wrap-up (10 minutes): Students share their monologue with the class and discuss their thoughts and feelings about completing this activity. What was difficult about taking another person's perspective?

Assessment: Marking Rubric created on Rubistar (http://rubistar.4teachers.org) (5%)

Inquiry Project Homework
Students continue to work on their Inquiry Project.
The teacher facilitates learning by meeting with each group and checking in with their project monitoring chart and template. Teacher guides students to maximally utilize the reference materials.
Worksheet: Is taking prisoners ok?



Canada: A People's History
Episode 1: Episode 1: An Air of savage Magnificency (5 min) and Captivity (6 min).

-Audacity (voice recorder)

- Rubistar (http://rubistar.4teachers.org) (5%)



KG-043
KP-047
KH-025
Celebration of learning!
Invitations are sent to parents and students present their inquiry projects to the class.

Following the presentations, refreshments will be served.

Assessment: Individualized marking rubric created at the beginning of the learning experience. Please see link in resources for weighting of marks.
Take-Home Test: Students receive a copy of the take home test, which is due the following day. The text is also posted on the teacher's wiki. Students have the option for electronic submission or provide teacher with an oral report the following day.
Review Assessment Evidence:



Take Home Test:









List of Technology Supports I created a Glogster () Poster to visually depict the various technologies utilized throughout this unit. To view the poster, move the cursor on top of the poster and click "view full size". It will open the poster to a new window. From here, I have created links to manufacturer websites that will further explain the various software technologies.



Rationale and Description of Technologies Utilized Throughout This Unit


There are vast amounts of varied technology supports available to educators. Technology utlized throughout this unit was carefully chose to the support the specific needs of students (as indicated from the Class Learning Profile).

Technology
Description
Rationale
SmartBoard (2009)
SmartBoard is an interactive white board. It connects to a laptop or computer and projects images from the computer directly onto the interactive whiteboard. The features touch technology, allowing for the development of hands-on and engaging learning experiences. When planning for diverse learners, the SmartBoard interactive whiteboard naturally allows for multiples means of representation and engagement. SmartBoard allows educators cater to a variety of multiple intelligences and provide lessons that will reach all learners. Visual media can easily be adjusted to incorporate audio, and vice versa. Another advantage of the SmartBoard is that it has the ability to record the daily lesson. It will record everything that was said and done with the interactive whiteboard.
Luckily, I have a SmartBoard in my classroom. I chose to use this technology to provide for multiple means of representation and engagement for my students. Many of my students have difficulties with reading strategies (decoding, fluency, comprehension).

Using the SmartBoard, I can easily adapt text and provide visual and auditory examples related to the learning context. In addition to this, the touch technology of the SmartBoard enables me to get my students involved and active with the learning process. They all enjoy coming up to the interactive whiteboard and touching the screen or writing examples.

In addition to this, the SmartBoard connects to my laptop, which enables me to model the other various technologies students will be expected to use on their own.

Finally, I really like the recording option. I often record my lessons and students have the option of listening to the lesson, or parts of the lesson over again. It is also useful when learners are absent for the day.
Read and Write Gold (2004)
Read and Write Gold provides support for a variety of reading and writing needs. The most useful supports consist of as text-to-speech, speech-to-text, word prediction, and a talking dictionary. Read and Write Gold technology has the ability to access and support reading of any text that is found on the computer (word documents, online text, and scanned documents).
I chose to use this specific software program, as it is currently available to all students at my school. Many of the students I teach need support with reading and writing, thus Read and Write Gold technology helps to provide an inclusive learning environment to meet the diverse needs of my students. Most of my students prefer to use this technology and adjust the levels of support, as needed. For instance, some students require the text-to-speech feature, while others only use the talking dictionary.
Online Graphic Organizers

ReadWriteThink(2009).

Learn Alberta(2009).
Online graphic organizers provide for multiple means of action and expression. Graphic organizers assist learners in organizing their thoughts and information. Online graphic organizers have several advantages over paper organizers. For instance, they are much more flexible. When a graphic organizer is manipulated using a computer, students that require additional supports, such as text-to-speech or speech-to-text, can also benefit from the organizer. The graphic organizer and text can also be enlarged and manipulated as needed.
Once again, I chose to use online graphic organizers to support the diverse reading and writing needs of my students. In addition to inspiration software, online graphic organizers are easily accessible for students and can be accessed outside of school. Graphic organizers help students to find key information and ideas within text, while also providing a means for them to keep their own thoughts and research organized.
Audacity (n.d.)
Audacity is a free, download-able voice and sound recorder that creates mp3 files.
Audacity provides my students with multiple means of expression. Many of the learning activities allowed for choice of recording responses using Audacity to create an mp3 file.
Inspiration (2009)
Inspiration software caters to visual learners and provides tools for students to build visual graphic organizers that plan and organize their thoughts. In addition to It helps students to plan, organize and research material for assignments.
Graphic organizers provide students with multiple means of action and expression. This software is available at my school and assist students when planning and researching material for their inquiry projects. The technology can be easily manipulated to provide additional supports, such as text-to-speech, and enlarging text and pictures.
Computers with internet access
Computers are necessary to access many of the support technologies.
I am fortunate to have access to laptops on a daily basis. There are enough laptops for each student. Using personal laptops, students can access the appropriate software technologies necessary to support their unique learning styles and needs.
Video
Videos provide for audio and visual means of presenting information.
Using video to present information engages students and provides them with a visual and audio means of engaging with material.
Rubistar (2008)
Rubistar is a free on-line program that enables educators to create rubrics for assessment.
It is beneficial for students to be involved with the development of expectations and assessment details. As my students were working on various inquiry projects, Rubistar provided me with a simple and convenient way to create multiple rubrics for individual assessments. Each of the Rubrics can be saved, accessed on-line, or printed.




Research: Technology and UDLimages.jpg

References

Audacity (n.d). Retrieved December 2, 2009 from: http://audacity.sourceforge.net/

Inspiration (2009). Retrieved December 2, 2009 from: http://www.inspiration.com/Inspiration

Learn Alberta (2009). Graphic organizer templates. Retrieved Decelber 1, 2009 from: http://www.learnalberta.ca/content/ssass/html/graphicorganizers.html

Read and Write Gold (2004). Brighteye Techology. Retrieved December 1, 2009 from: http://www.readwritegold.com/

ReadWriteThink (2009). Webbing Tool. Retrieved December 1, 2009 from : http://interactives.mped.org/view_interactive.aspx?id=127&title=

Rubistar (2008). . Retrieved December 1, 2009 from : http://rubistar.4teachers.org/

Smart Technologies (2009). Classroom solutions. Retrieved December 1, 2009 from: http://education.smarttech.com/ste/en-us/